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Interdiction

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A Guide to Interdiction

Interdiction is a legal process where a court is asked to determine, from testimony and other evidence presented, whether a person is unable to consistently make reasoned decisions regarding their person and/or their property, or to communicate those decisions, and whose interests cannot be protected by less restrictive means. If such a finding is made, the court appoints someone to make these decisions for the person.

Brain Injury Alliance of Louisiana

BIALA and United Spinal Association, LA Chapter provides information and support to survivors of brain and spinal cord injuries, their caregivers and professionals. BIALA and United Spinal Association, LA Chapter provides access to numerous support groups throughout the state for those dealing with brain and spinal cord injuries.

Judicial Commitment and Interdiction

This brochure describes commitment, interdiction and other means of handling a situation where a person cannot make decisions for him or herself. Judicial Commitment is the process by which an individual is ordered by a court to receive treatment in a specific facility or location. Interdiction is a process that deprives a person of some or all of their rights. This includes the right to vote, marry, decide where to live, what doctor to see, etc.

Legal Competency - The Legal Status of Helping Someone Make Decisions

When someone needs help to take care of themselves, who can step in? How do you do it? What's the result?

Office of Citizens with Developmental Disabilities (OCDD)

OCDD gives information and services for Louisiana residents with a developmental disability, defined as a severe chronic disability caused by mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, or autism.

Planning for Incapacity and Advance Directives

A self-help guide to plan for incapacity including advance directive forms for Louisiana. By using advance directives, you can control your health care decisions, even if you become incapacitated in the future. You prepare the advance directives while you are capable of making your own decisions. Generally, they take the form of instructions to your doctor, or the appointment of someone to make decisions for you. They can cover specific treatments such as life-sustaining procedures, or be very general and cover all medical decisions.

Representing Yourself in Court: Your Rights and Responsibilities

Tips if you must handle your legal issue on your own without a lawyer. This document is strictly for informational purposes, it does not include legal advice.

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